Apr 26, 2016

Assemblyman Jim Wood's bill would allow landlords to prohibit tenants from smoking marijuana in a rented residence





Today in Sacramento,  Assemblyman Jim Wood presented a bill that would ensure landlords have the authority to prohibit tenants from smoking medical cannabis in a rented residence.  AB2300 passed the Assembly Judiciary Committee unanimously 10-0 today.

“This is about protecting families that live in close proximity to others,” said Wood.  “Second hand smoke can be a real problem, especially for families who live in apartments or other multi-family residencies.”

A recent study by the University of California San Francisco suggests that second hand cannabis smoke results in similar cardiovascular effects as tobacco smoke, and in fact, may result in as much as a 70 percent drop in blood vessel function[1].

Matthew Springer, Professor of Medicine in the UCSF Division of Cardiology[2], and a member of the UCSF Center for Tobacco Control Research and Education said, “Tobacco and marijuana smoke share thousands of chemicals that result from burning dried plant material, and many of these chemicals are harmful.  The adverse cardiovascular effects of secondhand marijuana smoke have only recently begun to be studied, and we are seeing that just a few minutes of exposure to secondhand smoke from tobacco and marijuana have the same negative effect on the ability of arteries to carry enough blood, with marijuana causing a longer-lasting effect than tobacco.”

AB 2300 applies specifically to the smoking of cannabis.  Patients would maintain their right to access and use medical cannabis through other consumption methods such as edibles or oils.

Assemblyman Wood said, “Landlords have the authority to prohibit tenants from smoking tobacco in the home, the same rationale applies for cannabis.  AB 2300 would clarify that this authority applies to smoking cannabis as well.

Professor Springer said, “If someone needs to take marijuana for medicinal reasons, there are ways to do it that don't force bystanders to take it as well.  The bottom line is that the public should be protected from unintentional exposure to secondhand smoke, whether it comes from tobacco or marijuana; laws that protect the public from secondhand tobacco smoke exposure should apply to marijuana as well.”

AB 2300 will be heard next in the Assembly Appropriations Committee.

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